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Table 4 Comparison of recall of nutrition education topics and messages by post-program caregivers and CG groups1

From: Maternal participation in a nutrition education program in Uganda is associated with improved infant and young child feeding practices and feeding knowledge: a post-program comparison study

  PP n = 50 CG n = 61 P-value (2-tail) P-value adjustedb
Washing children’s hands before feeding, general hygiene messages 41 (82%) 0 (0%) <0.001c NA
Feeding different kinds of foods 35 (70%) 12 (20%) <0.001c <0.001c
Not adding too much water to the child’s meals 27 (54%) 0 (0%) <0.001c NA
How often to feed infants and young children 27 (54%) 10 (16%) <0.001c 0.001c
Feeding a small amount of food that my child can finish 23 (46%) 0 (0%) <0.001c NA
The importance of breastfeeding 18 (36%) 7 (11%) 0.002c 0.009c
Feeding more “sauce” than food to provide adequate protein 14 (28%) 1 (2%) <0.001c 0.010c
Growing foods in my garden that my child can eat 13 (26%) 1 (16%) <0.001c 0.005c
Feeding soft foods 11 (22%) 9 (15%) 0.323 0.480
Monitoring/being attentive to my child when she eats 8 (16%) 0 (0%) <0.0013 NA
Feeding during and after my child gets sick 5 (10%) 7 (11%) 0.803 0.199
  1. aValues shown are number (proportion as a percentage of group total)
  2. bAdjusted for presence of father in the home, maternal education, primary means of food acquisition, type of wall construction material in respondent’s home, and underweight status of the child
  3. cResult was significant, p < 0.05