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Sport nutrition and dietary supplementation

Section edited by Truls Raastad 

This section considers studies on all diet and nutritional supplementation to enhance performance and health, including cognitive function, physical activity, body composition, and nutrition.

  1. The number of people preferring plant-based nutrition is growing continuously in the western world. Vegetarianism and veganism are also becoming increasingly popular among individuals participating in sport. H...

    Authors: Josefine Nebl, Jan Philipp Schuchardt, Paulina Wasserfurth, Sven Haufe, Julian Eigendorf, Uwe Tegtbur and Andreas Hahn

    Citation: BMC Nutrition 2019 5:51

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  2. Supplementation with large doses of antioxidants, such as vitamin C and E, has been shown to blunt some adaptations to endurance training. The effects of antioxidant supplementation on adaptations to strength ...

    Authors: K. T. Cumming, T. Raastad, A. Sørstrøm, M. P. Paronetto, N. Mercatelli, I. Ugelstad, D. Caporossi and G. Paulsen

    Citation: BMC Nutrition 2017 3:70

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  3. Establishing an understanding of an athlete’s nutrition knowledge can inform the coach/practitioner and support the development of the athlete. Thus the purpose of the study was to develop a psychometrically v...

    Authors: Matthew James Walter Furber, Justin Dene Roberts and Michael George Roberts

    Citation: BMC Nutrition 2017 3:36

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  4. Resistance exercise and protein intake are both strong stimuli for muscle protein synthesis. The potential for a protein to acutely increase muscle protein synthesis seems partly dependent on absorption kineti...

    Authors: Håvard Hamarsland, John Aleksander Larssen Laahne, Gøran Paulsen, Matthew Cotter, Elisabet Børsheim and Truls Raastad

    Citation: BMC Nutrition 2017 3:10

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

  5. Acute effects of caffeinated and non-caffeinated cocoa on mood, motivation, and cognitive function are not well characterized. The current study examined the acute influence of brewed cocoa, alone and with sup...

    Authors: Ali Boolani, Jacob B. Lindheimer, Bryan D. Loy, Stephen Crozier and Patrick J. O’Connor

    Citation: BMC Nutrition 2017 3:8

    Content type: Research article

    Published on:

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